Crown Treatment at Oldmachar Dental Care

What is a crown?

A crown (or cap) is a dental restoration that partially or completely covers the outside of the real tooth, above the gum line. It is shaped to look exactly like your own tooth, and is usually made from ceramic.

A crown can be suggested for many reasons, but common indications include if a tooth is broken or showing signs of cracking, or when an old and large filling is no longer sufficient. A crown is a stronger and longer term solution than a filling for teeth requiring larger repairs.

A crown is what is known as an indirect restoration. This is because the tooth is prepared at one visit and the restoration is fitted at a separate appointment. The restoration is constructed in a laboratory between the 2 visits.

At Oldmachar Dental care, we use a material called ceramic for our crowns. This modern technique offers a metal-free solution, which can give the strength of a bonded crown and the appearance of a porcelain crown. Therefore it is suitable for use in all areas of the mouth.

What is involved in the treatment?

Your crown treatment will be divided over two appointments, with roughly 19 days in between the appointments to allow for the work to be prepared by the lab.

Appointment 1, Preparation:

Before the dentist starts work, anaesthetic will be used to numb the nerves around the tooth. The dentist will first use a numbing gel, so you don’t feel the injection.

The dentist will take your tooth shade for the restoration so it matches your natural tooth colour. This information will later be sent to the technician who is making your crown.

Firstly, the tooth needs to be prepared and cut to the correct shape. This will involve removing a layer of the outer surface, leaving a strong inner core. The amount of the tooth removed will be 1.6mm. The dentist will also remove any decay from the tooth. The dentist will usually use the high-speed handpiece to carry out this process, and the nurse will be on hand with the high power suction to remove any excess debris and water, Once the tooth is shaped, the dental team will take some impressions (mould): one of the prepared tooth, one of the opposite jaw and possibly another to show the way you bite your teeth together. These impressions are prepared for the technician who is going to make the crown in the dental laboratory. The impressions help the technician to build a restoration that fits the prepared tooth perfectly, matches the surrounding teeth and fits in with your bite.

The dentist will then prepare what we call a temporary restoration. This is a temporary solution that is made in practice, and protects the prepared tooth and maintains the spatial relationship to opposing and neighbouring teeth whilst you wait for your final crown to be placed at your next appointment.

Appointment 2, Crown Fit:

This is a shorter appointment than the first, as all of the preparation for fitting the crown was carried out at the first appointment.

To begin your appointment, the temporary restoration is first removed by the dentist. If you have been experiencing sensitivity with the tooth that is being treated, then anaesthetic will be placed before it is removed, but in most cases this is not required.

To remove the temporary crown, the dentist will either use a metal hand tool to gently pop it off, or in cases where it is more securely attached, the high-speed handpiece may be used to help the process. Any remaining cement would be gentle removed using a hand scaler.

Next, the prepared crown is tried in to ensure it fits and matches well with your other teeth. Once the restoration has been tried and the dentist is happy with it, the crown is permanently cemented in place.

Following your crown fit, it may take some getting used to before the permanent crown feels normal in your mouth; however, after a little time has passed, the crown should look, function, and feel like a regular tooth.

To ensure the longevity of your crown, it is important to follow the care instructions given to you by your dentist. This will include a recommended schedule for visiting the hygienist for a plaque prevention treatment.

Bridge Treatment at Oldmachar Dental Care

What is a bridge?

A bridge is a false tooth that is attached to 2 crowns either side of the gap that is being filled. It takes its name from being a bridge like structure between 2 teeth. Like our crowns, it is usually made from ceramic.

A bridge can help to restore chewing function and support your dental health if you have a few gaps caused by missing teeth. It can be a good alternative to partial dentures if you have enough strong teeth with good bone support to accommodate the bridge. Your dental team will help you to decide what is the best method of replacing any missing teeth you have.

A bridge is what is known as an indirect restoration. This is because the tooth is prepared at one visit and the restoration is fitted at a separate appointment. The restoration is constructed in a laboratory between the 2 visits, rather than directly in the mouth.

What is involved in the treatment?

Your bridge treatment will be divided over two appointments, with roughly 19 days in between the appointments to allow for the work to be prepared by the dental technician in their laboratory. During the first appointment, the dentist prepares the teeth and takes impressions, and during the second visit they will fit the bridge.

Appointment 1, Preparation:

Before the dentist starts working, anaesthetic will be used to numb the nerves around the tooth. The dentist will first use a numbing gel, so you don’t feel the injection.

The dentist will take your tooth shade for the restoration so it matches your natural tooth colour. This information will later be sent to the technician who is making your bridge.

Firstly, the teeth that will be supporting the bridge need to be prepared and made to the correct shape. These teeth are being prepared for the crowns that the bridge will be bonded to. This will involve removing a layer of the outer surface, leaving a strong inner core. The amount of the tooth removed will be 1.6mm. The dentist will usually use the high-speed handpiece to carry out this process, and the nurse will be on hand with the high power suction to remove any excess debris and water, In a standard bridge treatment, it is important that the prepared teeth are parallel to each other so that a good impression can be taken for a good fitting bridge.

Once the tooth is shaped, the dental team will take some impressions (mould): one of the prepared teeth, one of the opposite jaw and possibly another to show the way you bite your teeth together. These impressions are prepared for the technician who is going to make the bridge in the dental laboratory. The impressions help the technician to build a restoration that fits the gap and prepared teeth perfectly, matches the surrounding teeth and fits in with your bite.

The dentist will then prepare what we call a temporary restoration. This is a temporary solution that is made in practice, and protects the prepared teeth and maintains the spatial relationship to opposing and neighbouring teeth whilst you wait for your final bridge to be placed at your next appointment. Sometimes temporary crowns are placed on the prepared teeth instead of a temporary bridge filling the gap too.

Appointment 2, Bridge Fit:

This is a shorter appointment than the first, as all of the preparation for fitting the bridge was carried out at the first appointment.

To begin your appointment, the temporary restoration is first removed by the dentist. If you have been experiencing sensitivity with the tooth that is being treated, then anaesthetic will be placed before it is removed, but in most cases this is not required.

To remove the temporary bridge work, the dentist will either use a metal hand tool to gently pop it off, or in cases where it is more securely attached, the high-speed handpiece may be used to help the process. Any remaining cement would be gently removed using a hand scaler.

Next, the prepared bridge is tried in to ensure it fits and matches well with your other teeth. Once the restoration has been tried and the dentist is happy with it, the bridge is permanently cemented in place.

Following your bridge fit, it may take some getting used to before the permanent crown feels normal in your mouth; however, after a little time has passed, the crown should look, function, and feel like a regular tooth.

Aftercare

To ensure the longevity of your bridge, it is important to follow the care instructions given to you by your dentist. This will include a recommended schedule for visiting the hygienist for a plaque prevention treatment, as well as special care instructions for flossing. Underneath the bridge will need to be cleaned with a special floss and technique to ensure good gum health and prevent decay.

If you have further questions or concerns about your oral health,
speak to your dental team. We are here to help!

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